20.10.09

Scones

Scones are prolly the best afternoon tea I could enjoy, but the best are far far up mount dandenong which prolly takes me 2hrs to get there, and we're not even talking about the queue yet. I once had to wait 45mins or more for ms marples so we gave it a miss. Tip here is to get there aeap(as early as possible, read kiasu) or alap (as late as possible). At least for me I manage to beat the crowd ;) Other dishes are doable, but scones are still the best.



Sticky date pudding
chicken pie

turkey fingers


scones


http://www.missmarples.com.au/
382 Mt. Dandenong-Tourist Road Sassafras VIC
So since its technically unfeasible for me to savour them when the craving calls, the best way is to learn them!



Dreamy cream scones adapted from smitten kitchen

2 cups (10 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour, preferably a low-protein brand such as Gold Medal or Pillsbury

1 tablespoon baking powder

3 tablespoons sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

5 tablespoons chilled, unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch cubes

1/2 cup currants (I used dried cranberries, and chopped them into smaller bits)

1 cup heavy cream

1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 425°F.
2. Place flour, baking powder, sugar and salt in large bowl or work bowl of food processor fitted with steel blade. Whisk together or pulse six times.
3. If making by hand, use two knives, a pastry blender or your fingertips and quickly cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse meal, with a few slightly larger butter lumps. Stir in currants. If using food processor, remove cover and distribute butter evenly over dry ingredients. Cover and pulse 12 times, each pulse lasting 1 second. Add currants and pulse one more time. Transfer dough to large bowl.
4. Stir in heavy cream with a rubber spatula or fork until dough begins to form, about 30 seconds.
5. Transfer dough and all dry, floury bits to countertop and knead dough by hand just until it comes together into a rough, sticky ball, 5 to 10 seconds. Form scones by either a) pressing the dough into an 8-inch cake pan, then turning the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface, cutting the dough into 8 wedges with either a knife or bench scraper (the book’s suggestion) or b) patting the dough onto a lightly floured work surface into a 3/4-inch thick circle, cutting pieces with a biscuit cutter, and pressing remaining scraps back into another piece (what I did) and cutting until dough has been used up. (Be warned if you use this latter method, the scones that are made from the remaining scraps will be much lumpier and less pretty, but taste fine. As in, I understand why they suggested the first method.)
6. Place rounds or wedges on ungreased baking sheet and bake until scone tops are light brown, 12 to 15 minutes. Cool on wire rack for at least 10 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Scones really take practice, so dont expect perfect ms marples quality popping out of your oven on your first try. Though, the jam that goes with your afternoon tea will do its wonders :)


Have a great week ahead!
pen2y

3 comments:

Starningblue said...

Pen, okay let visit here when we are in Melbourne next year!

Whos driving??

pen2y said...

Me la! you know the way meh!

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